How to Leave Teaching

A guest post by career coach Eva Wislow

 

Since you’ve been in the teaching profession for a while, you probably know of this myth: Half of new teachers quit the profession within five years. Fortunately, that “stat” is not really true. According to the latest research, it’s 17% of new teachers that leave the profession.      

Now that we got that out of the way, let’s be real: 17% still is a lot. And if you’re one of the teachers thinking about changing careers, there’s nothing to be ashamed of, and there’s definitely nothing to be scared of. It’s your decision to make.

Still, the transition won’t be easy. You’re accustomed to classroom activities, and there’s hardly any other profession that mimics the connection you make with students. It will be a big shift, and you have to be prepared for it.

We won’t talk about the reasons here. Maybe you’re ready to quit because of the low pay and long hours of work. Maybe this isn’t the ideal profession you thought it would be. Whatever the case is, it’s up to you to make a smooth exit.

How do you leave a teaching profession? How do you make this transition as effortless as possible? Let’s go through some helpful tips.

1   Be Aware of the Choices

When teachers are ready to leave, they have a few options to choose from:

  • A new career
  • A new profession that requires re-training
  • Self-employment
  • Retirement or quitting work for any other reason

Retirement is a different story, and we won’t tackle it in today’s article. We’ll talk about the career paths that people can pursue after leaving the teaching profession. The good news is that such an option is available, but you have to figure out what it will be.                                             

2   New Careers for Teachers: Without the Need for Retraining

Teachers are in high demand, even outside the classroom.

A career in online tutoring, for example, is a nice option if you want to work from home. The online tutoring industry is growing fast. Many of today’s students have difficulties meeting the standards of the educational system. They need assistance in all subjects, so you could use your expertise to help them succeed.

Academic writing is another great career that allows you to benefit from the skills you already have. Roberta Sanchez, part of the writers team at CareersBooster, explains: “When you start working as an academic writer for a reputable service, you’ll get a regular flow of orders, but you can still manage your own time. This is a great alternative for teachers who want to work from home, but it’s also a great way to make extra money while working on re-training for a different profession.”

Teachers already have the soft skills for many other professions, too. They may work in recruitment, counseling services, retail, or any other job based on face-to-face interaction.

3   You Can Opt for Any Other Career If You Get More Training

The Guardian listed five very attractive alternative careers for teachers leaving their jobs:

  • Museum educator
  • Education liaison roles
  • Work for an educational supplier
  • Tutoring
  • Corporate learning and development

Your work as an educational supplier or tutor will hardly require re-training. However, if you want to become a museum educator or corporate trainer, you’ll need some reschooling. These professions are not what your options are limited to. You can pursue any career if you get the needed training. You may even opt for online courses. Coursera gives you tons of opportunities for affordable certification.

Speaking of Coursera, online education is a great career to consider, too. You just need to gain the skills needed to plan, design, and promote an online course. When you’re ready, you can start creating your own educational materials.  

4   Self-Employment Is a Thing to Consider, Too

Many teachers decide to leave their jobs because they want to start their own businesses. Starting a small business is a huge step, but it’s also a wonderful experience.  

But be careful; the adventure may turn into a disaster if you’re not prepared.

  • Did you do your research? Do you know what it takes to start a small business? You need the perfect business plan, one that is realistic but motivating at the same time. You have to know what the competitors are doing. You have to be aware of the laws you’re subjected to. You have to keep all expenses in mind.
  • The world of taxes is quite complicated. You can take some online courses to figure out how accounting works, but it’s always easier to hire an accountant.
  • Are you prepared to get into a career full of risks? Your job as a teacher was relatively secure and predictable. You had a plan and had some control over the course of each day’s events. When you start your own business, the decision-making processes may be more challenging.

 

Take this last tip into consideration: don’t leave your job as a teacher before you know exactly what you’re going to do. You may work on re-training or develop a business plan over the summer. When you’re absolutely sure that you want to pursue a different career path, go ahead and good luck!                                                                                                                

About the author: Eva Wislow is a career coach and HR expert from Pittsburgh. She is focusing on helping people break down their limits, find a dream job and achieve life and career success. She finds her inspiration in writing and peace of mind through yoga. Follow Eva on Twitter.

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