How Teachers Can Get 10,000 Steps Every Day

Teachers have an advantage over many other professionals: our job doesn’t require long hours of sitting at a desk. Most of us are on our feet much of the day. Many of us circulate through our rooms, checking on students and assisting them. We walk to the copy machine, the staff lounge, perform bus and recess duty, and walk our kids to and from encore classes. We have many opportunities to move.

And yet after my wife bought me a Fitbit Alta and I started tracking my daily steps, I noticed that it wasn’t often I reached 10,000 steps by the end of the workday. And once I was home, I was too exhausted to do anything other than sit in my favorite chair.

But when I got serious about losing my Christmas Break weight, I knew that one thing I had to do was get those 10,000 steps. So I brainstormed and came up with the following ways teachers can get 10,000 steps every day.

1. Move before school

When I’m in the room with students, I don’t get many steps. So I try to get 2,000 steps before they arrive. The main way I do this is by intentionally being less efficient than I want to be. I send something to the printer, go get it, and then come back to my room and send something else. This forces me to walk to the copier multiple times. I make a separate trip to the staff lounge to put my lunch in the fridge. I make another trip to the office to turn in forms. It takes me longer to do things, but I pile up the steps.

2. Move around the room

Instead of standing in one place at the front of the room, I try to walk around while reading aloud or when students are working. Not only does it get me more steps, it helps with proximity and makes me a more attentive teacher. It doesn’t add a ton of steps, but every little bit helps.

3. Embrace duty days

I don’t love the fact that I have to do recess duty, but since I have to, I might as well take advantage of it. I try to move the entire time I’m outside. I walk back and forth, talking to students. Sometimes, I play basketball or kickball with them. I usually get around 2,000 steps during a twenty minute recess. If you have bus or hallway duty, you can do the same thing. Don’t just stand there, move! It will get you steps and you’ll probably do a better job monitoring students.

4. Walk during planning time

It’s tempting to take a break during planning time. Mine’s at the end of the day, after I’ve been on my feet for most of six hours. But on those days I sit during planning time, I don’t get 10,000 steps. Use planning time to visit the office or copy room or staff lounge. Take a lap around the playground for some fresh air and extra steps. Walk the halls a few times before heading back to your room to do some work.

5. Walk during lunch

I know. Teachers get shafted when it comes to lunch. While other professionals get a full hour, we’re lucky to get 30 minutes. But the truth is, it doesn’t take me 30 minutes to eat. I’m usually done in 10 or 15. So sometimes I take those last ten minutes and walk the halls in the winter or speed walk a block or two outside when the weather is nice.

6. Park farther away

I admit. I don’t do this one. But another way to get more steps is to park the farthest away from your room as possible. You might be able to get an extra 500-1,000 steps between walking to your room in the morning and back to your car after school. If you leave for lunch, there’s another bunch of steps.

7. Check your pedometer regularly

I’ve worn mine long enough now that I know if I don’t have 5,000 steps by lunch, I’m unlikely to get 10,000 by dismissal. I know if I don’t have 2,500 before students arrive, then I’m behind the eight ball. I know if I don’t have 8,000 by the end of recess than I’m in trouble. When I see I’m behind schedule, it inspires me to find more ways to move. Getting 10,000 steps is like anything: if you make it a priority, you’ll find ways to do it.

It seems to be working. I’m down eight pounds since January 9.

What ideas do you have? What tricks do you use to get more steps? Let me know in the comments.

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