How to Make a Good First Impression On Your Students

The first day of school will soon be upon many teachers. We’ll spend the night before tossing and turning, our brains sparking with anticipation, excitement, and anxiety. We know how important it is to get the first day right. We’re setting a tone, establishing a culture, and sending messages with everything we say and do.  At the very least, we want to make a good impression on our students. They’re going to be spending more time with us than with their parents over the next ten months, and it’s important they like us enough to want to come back each day.

About a month ago, a teacher who had just been hired for her first job wrote me and asked what I do to make a good first impression on students. Here’s what I told her:

Dress Professionally

I always wear a tie on the first day, even if it’s 95 degrees and we’re going outside for an icebreaker. People judge others based on their appearances. We don’t have to like this fact to know that it’s true. Kids are people, and they are especially harsh and honest critics. Don’t look like a slob. If you want to be treated like a professional, dress like one. If you want authority (and you should), wear the uniform.

Know Your Students’ Names

When I was a kid I was a huge baseball fan. I knew stats, the value of almost every rookie card I owned, and the jersey numbers of every player on the Detroit Tigers. It’s easy to memorize stuff that’s important to you. Knowing your students names on the first day is important. To the extent possible, know your students’ names before they walk in on day one. Get hold of a yearbook, highlight the kids on your roster, and study their names and faces. You’ll be able to call on them by name that first day, and your continual use of their names will make it easier for classmates to learn them. It will also prevent you from needing to play that horrible name game that wastes time and makes students uncomfortable.

Note: If you’re looking for good icebreakers, check out this article from Cult of Pedagogy

Project Confidence and Authority

Confidence and authority come from experience, but lacking that, fake it if you must. Preparation will give you confidence and confidence lends you authority, so over-prepare. Speak assertively, even if you don’t feel assertive. Leave no doubt that you believe 100 percent in what you’re saying, even if you suspect you might be full of shit. Students want to feel like they’re being led by someone who knows what they’re doing. They also want to feel safe, and having a confident, assertive teacher that sets limits sends the message that their learning will be protected.

Smile

Part of the confidence you display can be in how relaxed you are in front of your students. Smiling breaks down barriers and conveys the message that you’re comfortable and nothing will ruffle your feathers. Smiling makes people more likable. It also makes you seem more intelligent. And you can be assertive without being a grump. When a kid asks you if they’re allowed to [fill-in-the-blank], tell them assertively, “Nope.” Then smile.

Use Your Hands When You Speak

Research shows that people like speakers who use their hands. They find them more charismatic. A study of TED Talks found a correlation between the number of hand gestures and the number of views. A cardinal sin is putting your hands in your pockets. Even if you don’t gesture, keep your hands visible. It makes you seem more open and approachable.

Make Eye Contact

A problem I had early in my career was not looking at my students. I’d look over them, but not actually at them. Good speakers make a personal connection to listeners by looking them in the eyes as they talk. Try to make eye contact for three seconds with a student before moving on to another one. Looking at your students sends two important messages:

  1. You’re talking for their benefit, not just to hear yourself.
  2. You’re “with it.” Students will realize you’ll notice if they’re not paying attention.

Show Vulnerability

One way to quickly connect with others is to share something personal. Showing vulnerability makes you authentic. You’ll immediately humanize yourself. Nobody likes people who act like they’re perfect. Be willing to tell your students something that embarrasses you a little. You might start by telling them how nervous you are. Since they are nervous too, this will help them relate to you and begin to erode walls that exist between teachers and students.

What else do you do to establish rapport, build relationships, and make a great first impression on your students? Let us know in the comments or on Facebook.

_________________________

Other First Day Advice:

3 Common First Day Mistakes from Smart Classroom Management

Overcoming the Back-to-School Teacher Jitters… by Angela Watson

Classroom Management: 4 Keys to Starting the Year Off Right from Cult of Pedagogy with a heavy assist from Michael Linsin

 

As a Teacher, You Need to Appreciate the Daily Work You Do

Guest Post by Alice Clarke

Alice Clarke is an experienced and passionate teacher who has dedicated more than 3 years of her life to inspiring young minds in the classroom. Today, Alice likes to write about innovative educational approaches, the struggles that teachers face and ways to make their work much more enjoyable.

Image Source

For many teachers, self-worth and value come from the appreciation that they get from students. While this is a great and important form of validation, self-appreciation can go even further.

The job of a teacher is a really challenging one – it involves a lot of quick thinking, experimentation with different approaches and compassion. This is why, as a professional involved in education, you need to reach some level of self-appreciation.

Most professionals out there crave at least a little bit of recognition for the work that they do. Teachers are far from an exception. If you want to feel inspired as a teacher, you have to start giving yourself the kudos that you deserve. Here are a few simple ways to introduce the change in your life.

Build Your Self Confidence

The first and probably the most important thing to do is to build your self-confidence. Not only will you feel a lot more satisfied with the work that you do, you’re also going to act as a role model for kids who doubt themselves and their abilities.

Be the thing that you want to inspire in your students. Such a change could be difficult at first. So many teachers feel under-appreciated and pressured by the school administration, by parents and even by their students. Still, you have to recognize the importance of the work that you do and the manner in which it can shape up the life of a young individual.

Children are watching you all the time. They’re incredibly intuitive and perceptive. Even if you think that low confidence isn’t showing, children have a way of picking up such vibes.

This is one of the main reasons why you have to understand how crucial your role in their lives is. Celebrate every single success and recognize your role in it. If you take pride in your accomplishments, you will also make it easier for others to respect and honor you.

The Positive Impact of Small Gifts

Sometimes, we all need a tangible object to stand as a token of appreciation. Getting cards and small gifts from students is definitely that all teachers adore. Giving yourself little presents is another excellent idea that you can practice to boost self-appreciation. Once the inner change begins, chances are that students will also take notice and their attitude will change.

A gift doesn’t have to be expensive or even bought. You can write about the things that make you feel great at the end of the work week. “Collecting” such memories and getting to relive them in the future can be tremendously inspiring.

Accept responsibility for the successes of your students. True, they need the potential to learn and excel academically. It is you, however, who has inspired them and guided talented kids in the right direction.

Finding access to better teaching supplies is another great way to increase your level of self-appreciation and creativity. Negotiating such challenges with the administration can be notoriously difficult but the outcome will definitely justify the effort.

Stop Comparing Yourself to Others

Every school has at least one stellar teacher – a person that kids adore, that gets along well with everyone and that seems to be out of this world. If you compare yourself to this person, chances are that you’ll never feel the level of self-appreciation that you deserve.

Stop comparing yourself to others. Once you do, you will recognize the merits of your professional approach.

Your teaching style is unique. You’re not the young educator who gets along effortlessly with kids and who has adopted all of these cool, hip hi-tech techniques. You can accomplish a goal in your own way, which is something to celebrate.

There’s no need to think about how others are doing it. Focus on your own methodology and observe the response of students to it. Chances are that you’re getting much better results than you would have ever expected.

Try New Things

While sticking to your own teaching style is definitely a good idea, you shouldn’t be afraid of experimentation.

Learning new things and pushing yourself a little bit further every single time will show you the amazing professional potential that’s hidden inside you. We are created to learn throughout our lives. While your methodology could be highly effective, chances are that the world of education offers many new and amazing techniques to try.

Keeping your work exciting and fresh is probably the best way to refrain from getting jaded. Even the most devoted individuals will experience professional fatigue every now and then. When the routine and boredom set in, the mission of a teacher will suffer.

Be brave, be bold, and do new things that both you and your students will enjoy. Don’t be afraid to push the envelope. Some of these experiments will potentially fail but at least you’ve tried. Attempting something new can give you amazing ideas to broaden your horizon, work better with kids and get satisfaction out of the work that you do every single day.

Validation comes from the inside. While getting recognition from others feels great, it may be a long time before you are thoroughly appreciated for the work that you do. This is why you have to work towards recognizing your professional self-worth. As a humble teacher, you may find the task to be daunting at first. With the passage of time, however, you will find out that self-appreciation opens new opportunities and it ultimately makes you a better teacher.

_____________________

Related Content:

20 Free Ways to Recognize Teachers

The Best Way to Thank Your Child’s Teacher

_____________________

 

7 Tricks to Keep Yourself (& Your Students) Engaged After Lunch

tired

 

GUEST POST by Shundalyn Allen, University Instructor & Contributor to Wisewire

What time of day are your students most disruptive? When asked this question, many teachers identified the transition from lunch back to the classroom. Tiredness after meals is common because energy diverts to digestion. How can you boost your energy after lunch? Here are seven tips to boost your energy and keep your students engaged after eating.

1. Get Moving

When blood carries oxygen and nutrients to your muscles, you feel energized and alert. Get your blood circulating with some light exercise. Walking around your building or stretching for a few moments are simple ways to incorporate physical activity into your day.

2. De-stress

Exercise is not a one-trick pony. It directly affects stress. Physical activity triggers the release of endorphins, neurotransmitters that make you feel good. Don’t panic if you don’t have a lot of spare time or don’t feel fit enough for a high-impact workout. The Mayo Clinic reports that three ten-minute walks can take the place of one thirty-minute walk. You might even incorporate walking into a work duty. For instance, if you supervise recess or lunch, you can move around the playground, gym, or cafeteria as you monitor the students.

3. Stay Hydrated

Water prevents dehydration, which causes fatigue and makes it difficult for your body to operate properly. Drinking plenty of water will help your body maintain a state of alertness. For an additional boost, add a little lemon juice to your water bottle. Studies have shown that the smell of lemon promotes concentration, memory, and accuracy. In fact, it’s common in Japan to diffuse lemon-scented essential oils through the ventilation systems of businesses because it stimulates the mind while calming emotions.

Bonus: It tastes good! Track and maintain your daily water intake with this app.

4. See Yourself Where You Want to Be

Tired of being tired? Practice visualization by creating a mental picture of a desired outcome. For instance, teachers who mentally immerse themselves in a scene of a successful lunch-to-lesson transition increase the likelihood that they will experience the same smooth transition in real life. How can you do it? Picture your students’ engaged faces, the sounds of them pulling out their chairs to sit down, an intriguing question or problem written on the white erase board, and so on.

Another type of visualization involves envisioning each step of a process. Athletes do it all the time, but studies reveal that it also benefits the average person. In one study published by the Library of Medicine, thirty young volunteers exercised or visualized using their muscles. At the end of twelve weeks, both groups were stronger. The researchers concluded: “The mental training employed by this study enhances the cortical output signal, which drives the muscles to a higher activation level and increases strength.” In other words, when people imagine physical activity, the brain’s responds almost as if they were exercising in real life. The benefits of visualization aren’t limited to physical tasks. What an ideal option for teachers with little time for a full workout! Educators who incorporate visualization skills, such as guided imagery, into their lessons notice that students focus more on the subject matter. Will you try it out in your lesson plan?

5. Implement a Routine

Have you heard of the PAX Good Behavior Game (GBG)? According to the Game’s website, players work towards shared goals, cooperate with one another, and “self-regulate.” These skills translate to more engaged learning and significantly less time-wasting disruptions. Research indicates that the GBG reduces aggressive and disruptive behaviors in elementary school classrooms.

Even upper-grade classrooms flourish with an effective routine. Structure facilitates calm and focus. Whatever re-centering activity you choose—from answering a writing prompt in a journal to solving an equation or watching a short video—students should know the daily expectations. That way, they can begin working on the task as soon as they return to the classroom. And remember, routines shouldn’t be boring. Anticipating a fun video or an active game will give everyone something to look forward to in the afternoon.

6. Tap into Animal Energy

Playing with animals releases oxytocin, a hormone that inhibits stress and promotes focus and tranquility, according to a research study by the University of Missouri’s College of Veterinary Medicine. You probably can’t bring your dog to school, but some schools do allow small classroom pet, such as a goldfish, hamster, or lizard. Even watching the birds outside your window or installing a fuzzy bunny screensaver on your laptop can raise your spirits. Researcher Jessica Gall Myrick discovered that even people who viewed cat videos on the Internet experienced heightened energy levels and an increase in positive emotions.

7. Take a Nap

In Mediterranean cultures, it’s traditional to take a short nap called a siesta after the midday meal. Does sleep affect stress levels? Yes, according to SEMERGEN (Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians), brief naps improve heart function, mental alertness, and recall. One caveat, however, is that the benefits only appear if you nap on a regular basis. You might dismiss the idea of taking a nap at work. Who has the time? However, sleep expert Sara C. Mednick says that “you can get incredible benefits from [as little as] 15. . .minutes of napping.” Can you arrange your schedule to include a brief power nap during your free period or take a short nap after school before you start grading? If so, you can stave off the after-lunch drag.

If your students are rowdy after lunch and your energy is at its all-day low, you might find it extremely tough to get your class on task. Don’t lose hope. With a few small tweaks to your afternoon routine, you can turn your most challenging time into your favorite period of the day.
Shundalyn Allen is a University Instructor & Contributor to Wisewire. She started her career as a high-school French/ESL teacher in 2004. When she’s not in the classroom, she’s helping her clients, such as Grammarly and Wisewire, to provide engaging and practical content for their readers.

How Teachers Can Get Paid For Extra Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a number of studies that have attempted to determine how many hours teachers actually work. The Gates Foundation says 53 hours per week. The NEA claims 50. The Bureau of Labor and Statistics gave teachers a time-use survey and concluded teachers work about 40 hours each week. Teachers surveyed by AEI reported working an average of 44 hours, a little less than college-educated professionals in other fields.

Regardless of which study you believe, one thing is certain:

Teachers work a lot of hours for free.

In my last article, I argued that teachers are going to keep right on donating labor for a very simple reason: Employers like work they don’t have to pay for. If you’re willing to work for free, then don’t expect to ever be paid.

So how can teachers start getting paid for all the extra work they do?

The solution is simple. Stop working for free.

Don’t go in over the summer to set up and decorate your room. Don’t volunteer for committee work. Don’t attend after-school events. Don’t take work home to grade. Don’t meet with parents after school.

Unfortunately, that solution is also really hard. You’re probably uncomfortable just reading those ideas. That’s pretty messed up when you think about it. It shouldn’t be a radical idea to suggest that professionals be paid for their work. But most teachers with whom I share this idea react with at least one of the following emotions:

Anger

There is a subset of teachers who believe that teaching is a “calling.” They see it as special work that ought to be governed by special rules. They’re there for the kids. They’re selfless, often working to the point of exhaustion, and they wear that dedication proudly. The idea of them or their colleagues slacking off or demanding to be paid for things teachers have always done without compensation is offensive to them.

Guilt

A lot of teachers like the idea of being paid for all their work, but they know they’d feel guilty if they simply stopped. What will those colleagues who put in so many hours before and after school think of them? Are they being shallow or greedy for expecting pay for things others are doing for free? If they’re not working lots of hours, are they letting other teachers, their principal, their students, and their parents down?

Teachers who do decide to cut back on extra, unpaid hours almost always betray the guilt they’re feeling by justifying their decision with high-minded reasons, like spending more time with their family. They hardly ever say, “No, I quit that committee and go home right after work because I’m not paid for that stuff.”

But feeling guilty about not working for free is absurd.

Why should any professional feel bad for expecting to be paid for the work they do on behalf of their employer? For that matter, even if everything you do is “for the kids,” why shouldn’t you be paid for those things? Surely, acting in the best interest of children is deserving of compensation. Things are so backward in education that the party who should feel guilty –the district for taking advantage of their dedicated employees — actually have the audacity to lay guilt trips on teachers when they don’t volunteer their labor.

Fear

Some teachers worry that their districts might retaliate. They might ding them on their evaluations. They may put pressure on them by reminding them how much their colleagues are going “above and beyond” (which is perhaps the most insulting and manipulative phrase in education today). They fear what parents might say when they make what should be a reasonable request to meet during the school day instead of after hours when they’re no longer being paid.

Altogether Now…

There’s not much I can say to those who are offended by the suggestion they be paid for their work. For everyone else, the solution to guilt and fear is a unified teaching force that takes a stand and refuses to budge.

When teachers are unified in their conviction that they will be paid for their work, the ball is then in the hands of district leadership. They will no doubt respond by pressuring the staff to return to the status quo. They’ll argue that teachers knew the deal going in, that other teachers work for free, that it’s always been like this, that “professionals” do what needs to be done, that you’re there for the kids. They’ll lay on the guilt because they like not paying you. There isn’t an employer in the world that would turn down free labor.

When that fails (and a unified front that wants to actually get paid for their work must ensure that it does), then districts may seek to punish. They may threaten teachers with poor evaluations. They might engage in a public relations battle to convince parents you’re not working hard for their kids. They might not renew the contracts of the most vocal ringleaders.

This is what most teachers fear, but my suspicion is that it’s unlikely. Look at it from the district’s point of view. If no staff member breaks ranks, then the district will be in a difficult position. Are they going to give every teacher a low rating and risk their own reputation?Are they going to fire the entire staff and risk making the national news over refusing to give in to teachers who want nothing more than to be paid for their work? Are they going to convince parents they’re right and that teachers are greedy for wanting what other professionals get as a matter of course? It’s a losing argument, and teachers should force districts to make it.

Paying People Forces Decisions

Districts will have to decide whether or not that thing for which it’s been relying on free labor is worth enough to pay for it. There’s tremendous value in that. Schools try to be everything to everybody and waste a lot of their employees’ time. Committees are created that meet often but accomplish little. After-school events put a strain on everybody in a school and sometimes result in low turnout. They often draw only those parents who are most involved anyway.

If the work, the committee, or the after-school activity is important enough, then they’ll find a way to either pay teachers or free up time to get it done during contractual hours. Alternatively, they might negotiate new contract language that requires a certain amount of donated time (for which any decent bargaining team will gain concessions in other areas). They might also pay someone else to do the work. For teachers who complain that nothing is ever taken off their plates, their willingness to work for free is one of the reasons.

So will I be putting my money where my mouth is? Nope. As I said, this only works if everyone is in the boat and rowing in the same direction. Short of that, it would be foolish for teachers to go it alone or with just a few others. You’ll succeed only in making yourself look bad. So like almost all of you, I will be heading into my classroom in the next couple of weeks to get the copies made, the lessons planned, and the classroom organized. I’ll be doing those things because I take pride in my work. I’ll do them because I’m a professional.

And I ought to be paid like one.

One Way Teachers Can Fight Exhaustion Before It Starts

procedures

One of the best things about being a teacher is we get to start anew each fall. With the school year around the corner, exhaustion is probably far from your mind. After a restorative summer, you are likely itching to get started. You have new ideas you picked up at conferences, new strategies for dealing with behavior you can’t wait to try, new technology in your classroom, new colleagues or principals, and what feels like a new lease on your career. The stress and fatigue you felt at the end of last year has drifted away like a dandelion fluff on the summer breeze.

So I hope you’ll forgive me for raining on your vacation and dousing your enthusiasm.

The stress and exhaustion will be coming back unless you do something different this year.

There are many steps you can take, all of which I outline in my forthcoming book, Exhausted, but there is one you must absolutely do if you hope to have more energy at the end of your work days. And you must start before students show up on the first day of school. What is it?

Plan and Perfect As Many Procedures As Possible

Every teacher knows the importance of teaching, modeling, and practicing classroom routines until students have them down. Teachers who want to avoid student confusion and the resultant behavior problems know they must establish procedures for nearly everything that happens in their classrooms. We also know that well-executed procedures make our classrooms more efficient: students get more done when routines are followed.

What many teachers don’t realize is that having routines can help with their own fatigue.

One of the major causes of teacher exhaustion is decision fatigue. Every time you make a decision, you use some of your limited store of self-regulatory resources, often called willpower. Willpower is like a muscle in that it gets fatigued the more you use it. Each decision you make is like another rep in the gym. And just like your muscles, the strength of your willpower fades with more and more decisions.

Teachers make a ton of decisions, which is one reason they come home feeling drained. Although you intended to go to the gym, you can’t get off the couch. You meant to cook a healthy dinner, but it was easier to drive through McDonald’s. You planned to finally check those math tests, but you can’t bring yourself to even think about work. Those are the results of decision fatigue.

One trick to coming home with more energy is to make fewer decisions. You do this is by establishing habits. It’s estimated that 40% of the actions you take in a day are the result of habits, from hitting the snooze twice, to putting your left leg in your pants first, to the route you take to work, to ignoring most of the menu at a favorite restaurant because you always order the same two or three items. There are many choices for which we don’t use mental energy because they are ingrained as habits.

A procedure is a habit you want students to internalize. When they learn it, it saves them and you from deciding.

Instead of students asking you where to turn in their papers and you having to decide how you’d like them to do so every single time, you establish a routine for students to turn in their work. Instead of deciding each time whether it’s okay for a student to get out of their seat to grab a Kleenex or sharpen a pencil, establish set times during the day for these activities and teach routines so that students don’t have to ask you and you don’t have to decide. Instead of deciding for a student what he or she can do when she’s finished with her work, make a poster of all possible options ahead of time.

Small decisions add up. The fewer of them you make, the less tired you will be.

Be proactive by going through your entire school day and deciding ahead of time, while you have the energy that summer provides, which components of your day can be turned into a routine. If you find yourself making too many decisions once the school year starts, ask yourself if a new procedure is needed. Figure out ways to decide ahead of time so you don’t have to make decision after decision in the moment. Your future self will thank you.

Here is the list of procedures I teach:

procedures

 

 

 

 

 

I teach third grade, so not all will apply. Feel free to make a copy and change what you need to.

For help on how to teach routines, check out these posts by Michael Linsin:

How to Teach Routines
How to Use Music to Make Routines More Fun and Effective
How to Use the Power of One Strategy to Improve Behavior

__________________________

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/files/attachments/584/decision200602-15vohs.pdf)

For more information about willpower and decision fatigue, read the book Willpower.

Also read:

Why Teachers Are So Tired