Math Game: Build a Polygon

As we get closer to Christmas, things can get a little stale in the classroom. Teachers are tired, students are less tolerant of each other, and everyone has at least one eye aimed at the coming break. Many teachers look to spice things up a bit. They might show a movie, design a STEAM challenge, or set aside time for a holiday craft.

For some awesome ideas, check out John Spencer’s article 10 Creative Alternatives to Showing a Movie Before Break. Or just look at his graphic:

If you like your fun activities a little more closely aligned with the standards, you can have students play a math game. The game described below, “Build a Polygon,” comes from Education.com.  I like it because it gives students the opportunity to practice precise measurement, requires them to accurately read a ruler, introduces concepts of polygons, involves problem-solving, and provides practice in finding the perimeters of shapes. It’s also easy to play, easy to set up, and doesn’t require you to go out and buy stuff. It’s perfect for second through sixth-grade classrooms.

Game: Build a Polygon

polygon

This geometry  game will make your child a master of the polygon! He’ll compete against other players by measuring and drawing out shapes with playing cards determining the length of each line. Careful though, the measurements of lines will need to connect in order to close a polygon. If the card drawn doesn’t give the number he needs to finish his shape, start the line out or draw the line in another direction and wait to turn the next card. Whoever completes the most polygons wins!

What You Need:

  • Playing cards
  • Metric ruler
  • Pencils
  • Paper

What You Do:

  1. Announce the point system to all of the players as follows: Face cards= Wild (players can assign whatever value to the card that they want), Aces =1.
  2. Shuffle the cards and place them face down in the center of the table. Each player needs a pencil, ruler and a piece of paper.
  3. When his turn comes, each player should draw one card and use the value of their card to draw a line in centimeters.
  4. In order to determine the length of line needed to complete their shape, players will need to use their rulers, as long as the value is not too large they can begin drawing the line. Make sure to write the measurement number on the line.
  5. For the second round, everyone draws a new card and traces another line which stems from one end of the first line.
  6. Each player tries to make a complete polygon by closing their figure with the next turn. If they can’t finish their polygon with the card value drawn, they have two options. If the number on the card is less than the length of line needed to complete the shape, they can either start on the line that will eventually close the shape, or they can start a new shape stemming from either end of the shape they’re currently trying to complete.
  7. When a player finishes a polygon, they need to state its perimeter. For each correct answer, they receive 5 points. Then, they can start on the next polygon.
  8. Whoever earns 50 points first, wins!

Helpful Hints: Remind your little one throughout the game that a polygon is a closed plane figure bound by straight lines, whereas the perimeter is the distance around a two-dimensional shape.

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What are your favorite math games for the classroom?

What are some fun things your students do during the lead-up to the holiday break? 

Share in the comments and share this post on Facebook and Twitter so more teachers can read your ideas! 

Top Tips for Teaching Kids With Dyslexia To Read

Guest post by Laura Buckler

Top Tips for Teaching Kids with Dyslexia to Read

 

Dyslexia is a learning disability, but it is not a disease.

Kids with dyslexia simply process language differently from those without the condition. They have a problem with turning heard words and sounds into written form, and have a hard time remembering and reading words in isolation, such as on flash cards, or in sequence, such as the days of the week. Most people with dyslexia are of normal to high intelligence, and cope with their difficulties by accessing higher language learning skills.

Many kids with dyslexia reach adulthood without a proper diagnosis, and this can lead them to think they are not as intelligent as they actually are, simply because reading is a basic skill they have failed to master. They are scared that something is wrong with their brain, when in fact they simply learn differently.

While no one really knows what causes dyslexia, researchers believe it is hereditary. Because they learn differently from others, traditional methods for teaching them to read are not very effective. In many cases, the undiagnosed dyslexic child will use context to “read” without actually recognizing individual words to keep up with other children.

People with dyslexia can learn to read just as well as other people with the proper attention, methods, and tools. It is therefore important to diagnose the problem as early as possible to help them now and in the future. Here are the top tips for teaching kids with dyslexia.

Show and Tell (and Feel and Smell and Taste)

Kids with dyslexia learn to read best by engaging all their senses in the process.  This helps the brain create more associations with a particular word. This is the basis for the MSL, or Multisensory Structural Language, approach, and it works well with all language learners, not only people with dyslexia. Learners are encouraged to see, hear, smell, feel, and taste a word using various tools. Here are some ways to use the MSL approach with your child:

  • Use flash cards with a picture and the word printed together on it, and have the child hold it as they read the word. This gives them something to hold and look at as they say the word. Have them trace each letter with their finger as they read the word.
  • Use actual objects. Whenever possible, have the student hold the physical object of the word being taught. For example, if you are teaching the word apple, have them hold one, and encourage them to smell, feel, and eventually, taste it!
  • Use sand trays. Fill a flat, shallow tray with sand or beans in which the child can spell a word repeatedly. This engages their sense of touch and sight.
  • Use music. Songs, rhymes, and chants can help the child remember spelling rules and sequences.  For example, you can teach the child to spell “Mississippi” by chanting MIS-SIS-SIPPI!
  • Use color to classify different types of words and numbers. Use different colors for nouns, verbs, and other parts of speech. Use a different color to distinguish whole numbers from decimal numbers, and so on.
  • Use reading games. Games are always a good way to teach anything. Check out these links for some MSL games and activities to help your dyslexic child.

Start big

Some people with dyslexia see letters all jumbled up, and they have a hard time seeing subtle differences. Lower case p and q, for example, look the same to them. The same is true for b and d. To help them distinguish similar letters, write them big and bold, and put plenty of space between words. As they learn to recognize the letters, you can gradually make them smaller and closer together.

Just to be clear

Kids with dyslexia need a lot of reinforcement when learning to read. Do not assume that the student has any familiarity with the lesson. When introducing the letter B, for example, you should tell the student that it is letter of the day. You then clearly sound the letter out and ask the student to repeat it several times before introducing words beginning with the letter B.  Make the student say each word aloud several times before moving on to the next one. You can also use other strategies such as games and songs related to the letter or word.  

Repetition is the Key

Make it a habit to repeat everything several times to help kids struggling with short-term memory, which is common among those with dyslexia. Instructions, concepts, sequences, and words have a habit of slipping off into forgetful land. Encourage the student to write them down to help them remember, and make sure to correct any spelling mistakes.

An important aspect of teaching kids with dyslexia is connecting concepts when building new skills. Whenever you introduce a new lesson, make sure to connect it to an old one. If you must, refresh his or her memory by reviewing old lessons. A kid with dyslexia will learn something new better if they can associate it with something they already know or experienced.

Conclusion

Teaching kids with dyslexia to read is not hard if you accept and understand that they learn differently from other kids. Accommodate their learning styles and difficulties and give them practical coping skills using these tips and other teaching strategies. You will soon have them reading with the best of them.

 

BIO: Laura Buckler is a great writer, always making the best out of her articles. Her belief in life is that anything can be done with an amount of perseverance, so she puts an effort into all her duties. She teaches people to be aware of their potential. Check out her twitter.

Top 5 Online Resources for Teaching Writing

A guest post by Paul Bates, a teacher in Fresno California

Throughout kindergarten to the final year of high school, students should have acquired appropriate vocabulary, punctuation, style, and grammar skills for essay writing. Learning and practicing skills through technology is an incentive to learning since students consider it a ‘fun’ activity. There are hundreds of websites available for teaching writing and hundreds more are continually being created as technology advances. Online resources have improved the art of writing by providing available information that would have otherwise been out of reach.

Below, you will find a list of some of the best online resources to use when teaching writing.

Time4writing

This website offers free writing resources as well as 8-week online writing courses. Educators use this site to impart writing skills to students. The site incorporates the use of resources such as:

  • visual aids; for example: posters, flipcharts, and slides.
  • grading conventions; for example: K-2 in primary grading.
  • writing conventions; for example: spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation.

Full guidance is provided to the student. The creative inscription, paragraph, and essay writing are inclusive in the teaching package. Time4writing.com incorporates students from elementary school to students in high school. The site focuses on assisting students to put their ideas and thoughts in order before they are conveyed to a writing surface.

SolidEssay

This is an essay writing service that has been active since 2005. It offers professional and timely services to students who require writing services. The service opts to offer hired essay writers assignments that would otherwise be very time-consuming to a student. Solidessay.com has become one of the most reputable companies. This is mainly because work is assigned to experienced writers that hold a doctor of philosophy degree (Ph.D.) and a Master’s degree in the specified fields.

Online Writing Lab (OWL)

Purdue’s writing lab was created in 1994. It provides resources such as handouts, articles, journals, grammar and mechanics, citations and formatting styles. The teaching writing category is partitioned based on education level from grades 7-12 to college. Purdue’s OWL provides useful information to teachers and students in relation to writing. This includes instructions and formats for expository essays, email writing, letter writing, poems, etc. Basic information on writing citations and extensive research processes makes it a reliable educator to students. Students who are interested in becoming proficient in basic writing skills, formatting and styles, have a wide range of resources to acquire knowledge from.

Education Northwest

The Education Northwest website provides a writing program that focuses on the 6+1 writing traits. These traits are:

Identifying the idea and content
Structural organization of the essay
The tone and voice of the message being conveyed
The choice of vocabulary
Sentence fluency and clarity
Conventions and presentations

These qualities define standard writing. Learning experiences are catered for students in colleges as well as adults (parents and teachers). Writing skills offered to students assist in critical thinking and reasoning, especially in real life experiences. The website’s core resources are the K-2 rubric and 3-12 rubric which are educator-friendly.

Quill

This is a nonprofit organization that provides writing and grammar activities for students from elementary school to high school. Educators use quill activities to jog the minds of students before and during class. The activities have been researched and approved by language instructors. With the integration of device applications that educate on vocabulary, grammar, and writing. The website is preferred by most teachers in classroom assimilation. Quill activities cover over 300 convictions on grammar giving students a substantial amount of skill and knowledge needed in writing. This website is bent on improving writing skills of students between kindergarten and grade 12. The site provides favorable circumstances by instantly grading tests and providing individualized feedbacks and instructions. This contributes to their divulging writing skills.

In this digital and modern age, students have tools and resources that assist them to become exemplary writers at their disposal. Writing is the framework of basic communication and it is important to nurture the skill at a tender age. Educators who have access to the internet and its resources, enhance the learning experience of the student while propelling the desire to express themselves through writing. Inscription skills are related to credibility. Having good writing skills is a gateway and requirement for careers such as journalism and therefore it is a skill essential to those in media-related fields.

Author bio: Paul Bates is a school teacher from Fresno, California. He loves helping his students become better and stronger writers.