How Teachers Can Use Less Willpower

In a previous post, I listed four things that contribute to teacher fatigue: making decisions, using willpower, experiences high-intensity emotions, and worrying. In this post, I addressed how teachers can make fewer decisions. Today, I will share how teachers can use less willpower so they have the energy to make good decisions, even after a long day at work.

First, it’s important to understand that willpower is like a muscle: it can be strengthened with use, but it can also be overworked, leaving you unable to use it without recovery time.

Teachers, of course, use willpower all the time. Recalling last Friday, here’s a partial list of times I needed willpower:

  • Garbage truck in front of me on the way to work. I wanted to pass, but it wasn’t safe.
  • Arriving at work, I had a bunch of tasks to accomplish, most of which were tedious. I didn’t want to do them.
  • Resisted the temptation to snarkily respond to an email.
  • Donuts in the lounge at lunch.
  • Students playing with something in their desks instead of paying attention. Wanted to publicly scold.
  • Wanted to just sit and relax during my planning time, but forced myself to plan for the following week and prepare materials.
  • Lesson interrupted by the office PA system. Wanted to swear.
  • A student walked in late to class and interrupted. Wanted to lecture.
  • A student was on a game website instead of doing research. I wanted to take his Chromebook and throw it through a window, since this is the 100th time it’s happened with him.

You get the point. I’m sure you’re already mentally making your own list. In every one of those instances, willpower was required. By using it, I depleted my store of it, making it less likely I would have any left at the end of the day and also seriously taxing my body. No wonder teachers are pooped.

So how can we use less willpower at work?

Plan Ahead

Most of the time, we can anticipate those things that will require us to use willpower. I know that certain students are going to press my buttons. I know that if I don’t work now, I’ll be stressed later and have to use even more willpower to accomplish things. I know that when I get on the highway at 5 pm, I am going to get frustrated with traffic and have to use willpower to remain calm at the wheel and avoid bad decisions. (Fun fact: most car accidents occur between 3 pm and 9 pm. You might attribute this to the high number of commuters, but those people drive to work in the morning too. Might it be depleted willpower that contributes to poor driving decisions?)

If we can anticipate these events, then we can plan for them. This is exactly what Starbucks did when they introduced their LATTE training system to improve customer service. Starbucks gave their baristas very detailed systems to use when dealing with stressful situations, especially for when their willpower was low.

You can do this too.  Prepare ahead of time for how you will handle behavior problems. Implement your classroom management plan with strict fidelity and calmness instead of anger. Leave work 15 minutes later or take a different route home if you know your normal path will frustrate you. Emails from your principal usually piss you off? Don’t read them until dismissal.  Do you snack at night? Quit buying snacks and having them in your house. Does Kathy the science teacher annoy the hell out of you? Don’t go where Kathy goes. Identify your likely triggers, and plan ways to avoid or deal with them.

Distract Yourself

If you’re a teacher you’ve likely heard of Mischel’s  famous Marshmallow experiment. The “high delayers” resisted eating the marshmallow by distracting themselves, such as covering their eyes with their hands or turning around in their chairs so they couldn’t see the enticing object, or singing to themselves.

It might not be in many teacher training courses, but sometimes you just have to walk away or direct your attention to something else. Elementary teachers are masters at this. Instead of saying, “Steven, get your hands out of your desk! I’ve told you ten times already!” they will turn to angelic Sarah and say, “Sarah, I really like the way you have your hands folded in front of you.” If you make this a habit, you’ll use less willpower.

You could also distract yourself by thinking about all the beer you’ll drink after work, but that might not be as healthy.

Delay

Postponing can be effective if you’re trying to break a bad habit. In Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength, Roy F. Baumeister explains that people who tell themselves “not now, but later,” are generally less tormented by the temptation of something they are trying to avoid. So if you find yourself using willpower to not check your email throughout the day because it usually stresses you out, then simply tell yourself you will check it at the end of the day.

Vent

It takes a lot of willpower to suppress your personality, beliefs, and natural inclinations. Psychologist Mark Muraven and his team found that people who exert this kind of self-control to please others were more depleted than people who held true to their own internal goals and desires. When it comes to willpower, people-pleasers are at a disadvantage.

Instead of suppressing your desires, you need to get them out. But you can’t go around telling off Kathy and you can’t respond to the principal’s email with your honest opinion because that would get you fired. Here’s a method I’ve used:

I sometimes receive an email from a parent or supervisor that angers me. My instinct is to fire back. That’s a bad instinct, but that doesn’t mean I have to hold in those feelings. It also doesn’t mean I should vent to other teachers or my wife because they’ve got their own problems and nobody really wants to hear about mine. What I do instead is write my honest, no-holds-barred response into a Google Doc and put it in a file. It gets my anger out and it’s there for me to revisit. On those few occasions where I have reread it, my anger is gone and I wondered why I was so pissed off at the time. If you do this a few times, you begin to realize that your initial feelings are likely an overreaction and it becomes easier to avoid indulging them.

Other Ideas

Other recommendations I have seen are getting enough sleep, eating well, exercising, and meditating. All of these things can help in any number of ways, but they’ve also been shown to help people manage willpower.

What about you? What do you do to avoid using up your willpower? Tell us in the comments!

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Those Whiny Teachers

If you’ve ever scrolled into the comments section of just about any education article, you have undoubtedly been greeted by the sentiment that teachers are, by and large, a bunch of whiny losers.

My article, Why Teachers Are So Tired, elicited a number of comments, most of which were verbal nods of the head. This wasn’t surprising. This is a blog written by a teacher for teachers, and I don’t know any teacher who wouldn’t like more energy at the end of the day. But there was one comment that ruffled a few feathers. Strider opined:

Come on. Draw such a high salary with the most number of protected time other jobs don’t offer. And still can complain. Then don’t be a teacher, become a cleaner then u will know what’s the real “tired.”

It got me thinking why there is such a chasm between what teachers say about their jobs and what non-teachers believe.

Our Faulty Imaginations

I’ve been listening to the audiobook of Daniel Gilbert’s Stumbling on Happiness (which is excellent, by the way). Gilbert is a Harvard social psychologist who specializes in happiness. You’ve probably seen him on YouTube giving TED Talks and on TV standing in front of a large wall of blue dots.

Much of Gilbert’s book addresses how terrible people are at what he calls “affective forecasting.” It turns out humans really sort of suck at predicting how they will feel about future events because they fail to consider all of the details.

I had a dental appointment recently. First, I had a cleaning and then I was getting a crown on a chipped tooth. I figured it would last two hours. I was not looking forward to it. But when I got there I waited less than a minute before being called back. I had my favorite hygienist, and we enjoyed an excellent conversation about Caribbean cruises. When I told her my wife had been ill, she gave me an extra toothbrush so we could toss the old, possibly infected ones. The crown went on easily and my fake tooth looks better than the original. I was out of there thirty minutes earlier than I expected and left with a sore mouth, bloody gums, and a good mood.

Imagination is our brain’s greatest ability. No other animal can do it.  It constantly and automatically works as a prediction machine, adding our past experiences to our present in order to create a concept of the future. But like it did when I imagined my dental appointment, it gets things wrong a lot.

I think it’s our faulty imagination that leads non-teachers to conclude what it must be like to be a teacher.

Filling the Gaps

If you have ever wondered how the memory can store a lifetime’s worth of experiences, the truth, according to Gilbert, is that it doesn’t:

Our brains quickly reweave the tapestry by fabricating – not by actually retrieving – the bulk of the information that we experience as memory. This fabrication happens so quickly and effortlessly that we have the illusion that the entire thing was in our heads the entire time.”

In this way the brain operates like the blind spot of an eye, filling in gaps with material from around the area. Gilbert provides an example of being invited by your wife to accompany her to a party. Your brain may instantly create an image of a dull cocktail party in some anonymous hotel with bored waiters carrying trays of canapés past a bored harpist.  Gilbert writes:

We predict our reaction to the imagined event with a yawn that sets new records for duration and jaw extension.  What we generally fail to consider is how many different types of party there are – birthday celebrations, gallery openings, first nights, orgies, wakes – and how different our reactions would be to each.  So we tell our spouse that we’d rather skip the party, our spouse naturally drags us along and we have a marvelous time.  Why?  Because the party involved cheap beer rather than classical music and was precisely our style.  We liked what we predicted we’d hate because our prediction was based on a detailed image that reflected our brain’s best guess, which was in this case wrong.

Teachers Have It Easy

For most non-teachers, the only experience they have with teaching is their memories from their time as a student. As we just learned, these aren’t very reliable. Instead of remembering with perfect clarity, our brains fill in the gaps. Most student experiences are relatively benign.  People have some general memories of sitting a lot, listening to a teacher, doing some work, hanging out with friends. You might remember a particularly unique lesson or that time you got in trouble.

When you recall your elementary years, your memories are probably even pleasant: That art project your mom still has. The school musical. Listening to the librarian read James and the Giant Peach.

Unless you’re the child of a teacher (who tend not to leave whiny teacher comments on blogs), you don’t have memories of your teachers staying up late checking papers, attending boring meetings, dealing with unreasonable parents and administrators, or constantly being interrupted during lessons. From the perspective of a student and his faulty memories, a teacher’s job doesn’t seem very hard at all. So if teachers are complaining about it, it must be because they’re a bunch of whiners. Nothing in the non-teacher’s experience suggests it would be very difficult. Certainly not as hard as cleaning.

The Best Way to Predict

Gilbert’s research has shown that one of the very best ways to find out if you’re going to enjoy taking a job is simply to see how happy the people who work there are.  Gilbert says:

We found two things in our studies. One, using this method of making predictions can increase people’s accuracy dramatically. Two, absolutely nobody wants to do it. In our experiments when people are given a choice between using their own imaginations or using information given to them by other people who are actually having the experience that they would only be imagining, we find that virtually 100 percent of participants prefer to use their imagination. And they believe their imagination will lead them to be much more accurate. In fact, they’re wrong.

Of course, this advice works for teachers, too. When I imagine being a cleaner my memory creates a mosaic of having a lot of time on my own, working at a leisurely pace, joking with colleagues, and taking as long as I want on the toilet because I can just explain that I was in there cleaning the whole time. There are some disagreeable parts like unclogging the trash compactor and cleaning up puke, but overall, not that bad.

And that’s because for a time in college I worked as a cleaner in two dorms. Those are the things my memory has chosen to fill in the gaps between all the details I’ve forgotten. It’s almost assuredly as inaccurate as the vision Strider’s imagination conjured for him. If I really wanted to know what it’s like to be a cleaner, I should ask some cleaners.

And if people really want to know what it’s like to be a teacher, they should listen when teachers tell them.

 

When has an experience you predicted would turn out one way, actually been much better or worse? Tell us in the comments!

 

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Fewer Decisions = More Energy

Every teacher I know wishes they had more energy at the end of the day. They want to give their best to their family, just like they gave their best to their students. They want to exercise, work on a hobby, play with their kids, talk with their spouse, and some of them even wish they had more energy for checking papers and planning lessons.

In my last post, Why Teachers Are So Tired, I wrote about the four reasons teachers are so drained at day’s end.

This week and next, I’ll look at what teachers can do to reduce decisions, use less willpower, avoid emotional peaks and valleys, and handle worry so that they go home with more energy. In this article, I’ll tackle the first of those: making fewer decisions.

How to Make Fewer Decisions

It sounds simple enough: just make fewer decisions. And for some people in some jobs, it might even be possible to simply, through force of will, decide fewer things at work. But as teachers, we are inundated with situations that require us to decide. Planning is nothing but a series of decisions. We decide every time we check papers, when we rearrange seating charts, when a student asks to use the bathroom, how to handle a behavior problem, and on and on. We don’t have the luxury of simply not deciding. Our principals, colleagues, students, and parents are all waiting for us to choose. So how do we decide less?

Actually, we’re already doing it. Now, we need to do more of it.

Make it Automatic

Mark Zuckerberg wears the same gray T-shirt to work every day. When asked why he said:

I really want to clear my life to make it so that I have to make as few decisions as possible about anything except how to best serve this community.

Zuck’s ‘Drobe:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President Obama explained his wardrobe this way:

You’ll see I wear only gray or blue suits. I’m trying to pare down decisions. I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing, because I have too many other decisions to make.

Steve Jobs, Henry Rollins, Christopher Nolan, and even Albert Einstein later in life all subscribed to the same belief. They knew that the more decisions you make, the more tired you will be and the less energy you will have to make more important decisions later in the day.

Choosing your outfit is one decision you can easily remove from your day.* Once you start thinking about it, you will find there are many other decisions you can automate, and some you already do.

Most of you follow the same route to work and back every day. You don’t decide, you just do it. Same for nearly all of your morning routine. In fact, if you’re like me, you’re bothered when your morning routine gets thrown off for some reason.

You probably automate much of your banking. Thanks to technology, I make many fewer financial decisions than my dad did. I don’t have to decide when to deposit my paycheck, when and how much money to move into my daughter’s college fund, when to pay the bills, or how much to put into savings every month. All of that is set up ahead of time and now just happens.

It’s the key to making fewer decisions: automate as many of them as possible.

Go through your entire day. How many decisions do you already automate? What else could you automate? How about your workout routine? If you get to the gym and decide which equipment to use and what order to use it in, you’re using energy. If you just do the same thing every time or follow a predetermined schedule, you’re saving energy. Analyze every part of your day and eliminate as many decisions as possible. Don’t decide what to have for dinner every day. If you plan your meals for the whole week, then eating dinner goes on autopilot.

Decide Less At Work

At school, we’re well practiced in this. We call them routines, but the reason we teach them, model them, and have students practice them for the first two weeks (or two months) is so that they’ll become a habit and no one will have to waste energy thinking about them. How many other parts of your school day can you automate? Your entire morning routine? Your end-of-the-day routine? How students line up to leave the classroom? You probably already do these, and thank goodness. Can you imagine having to decide, every day, how you want students to line up?

Since many teacher decisions happen as a result of student behavior, a solid classroom management plan is a must. It can prevent problems that will require decisions from you. If consequences are clear and consistently enforced, there is no decision to make. You simply follow your pre-established plan. For more information on classroom management, I highly recommend Michael Linsin’s blog, Smart Classroom Management. He knows way more about it than I ever will.

Do a decision audit. List out everything you do in a typical day. How many of your decisions are already part of an automatic routine, and how many more could be with some simple, proactive changes?

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*If your principal has a problem with your wearing the same thing every day, just tell them that if it’s good enough for Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs, then maybe they should worry about more important matters.

What other decisions could you automate? Share your ideas in the comments so we all benefit! Thanks.

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Sources:

8 Reasons Successful People Are Choosing to Wear the Same Thing Every Day

Why Mark Zuckerberg Wears the Same Clothes to Work Every Day

The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha

 

 

 

 

Why Teachers Are So Tired

tired teachers

Are you tired after teaching?

Better question: When was the last time you weren’t tired after teaching?

If you’re like most teachers I know, including me and my wife, being tired at the end of the day is a way of life. We’ve become so used to it that it’s hard to imagine how it could be any different.

Our non-teacher friends have a hard time understanding how we could be so exhausted. After all, we’re not building houses, or working under tight deadlines, or competing with co-workers to sell the most widgets, or working in some ultra-competitive office with an unreasonable boss breathing down our necks. We work with kids! We work seven-hour days! We have a lot of control over our own schedules. We have summer vacation!  Some teachers have these thoughts themselves and wonder what’s wrong with them. How in the world can we be so tired?

There are three reasons.

Decision Fatigue and Willpower

Psychologist Roy Baumeister coined the term “ego depletion” after he found that humans have a limited supply of willpower.  He compares willpower to a muscle, which can strengthen, but also wear out with use. Ego depletion has a general effect, meaning that using self-control in one area of your life erodes your ability to self-regulate in other parts of your life. Baumeister found that exerting self-control results in a significant drop in blood-sugar levels.  Low blood sugar leads to physical fatigue, which is why you’re so tired, even though the heaviest thing you lifted was a textbook.

As a teacher, think of how often you use willpower.  We censor ourselves all day.  We hold back a sarcastic remark, walk away from a lazy student when we what we really want to do is lecture her, keep our honest thoughts about the principal’s latest idea to ourselves, respond professionally to a disrespectful email from a parent, work with a student when we want to do anything but, plan the next day when we’d rather check Facebook, hold it in when we’d like to drop an F-bomb. Teachers use willpower constantly.

But here’s the real kicker: making decisions uses willpower.  Researchers call this decision fatigue. The more decisions you make over the course of the day, the more willpower you use. There’s strong research that shows criminals are far better off going before a parole board early in the day than near the end of the day. Similarly, there is research that suggests the student’s paper that gets graded first gets a fairer score than the one graded last. After a day of making decisions, we don’t have the energy left to make good ones.

It’s estimated that teachers make about 1,500 decisions every school day. When you combine those decisions with all the necessary self-regulation involved with teaching kids, it’s no wonder our willpower is gone by five o’clock. We are exhausted.

High-intensity emotions

A second reason teachers are tired is the effect of high-intensity emotions. High-intensity emotions like anger, frustration, excitement, and elation are physiologically taxing. Positive emotions arouse the same physiological response as negative ones: our heart rate increases, our sweat glands activate, and we startle easily. Since it activates our body’s stress response, high-intensity emotions–whether positive or negative–wear us out.

Teachers are instructed to be enthusiastic in their lessons. Many teachers believe that to be their most effective, they must be energetic. They have to bring it! That might be true, but just know that your excitement, combined with your moments of anger, frustration, and even elation, will tire you out.

Worry

Not surprisingly, worrying is linked to fatigue. When we worry, we imagine and anticipate negative events. Our stress level elevates and our body activates its fight-or-flight response. Our hearts beat faster, we sweat, and our immune systems prepare a response. As a result, we get tired.

Teachers worry for all sorts of reasons:

  • students aren’t learning
  • behavior problems
  • a lesson is bombing
  • there’s a sub tomorrow
  • a parent is angry
  • the principal is coming for an observation
  • the copy machine is down and what am I going to do now?
  • my colleague is mad at me
  • I showed a movie and a character said “hell” and now the kids might go home and tell mom and dad and they’ll call the principal and I never even filled out the stupid form I’m supposed to fill out for the movie and…I’m sure you can think of many more.

So that’s why we’re tired all the time: we make a ton of decisions, we cycle between high-intensity emotions, and we worry too much.

But there are some things you can do about it. To find out more, check out my book, Exhausted, which goes into more detail about why teachers are so tired and provides the solutions you’re looking for!

What do you do to feel less tired at the end of the day? Leave your ideas in the comments (so I can steal them for subsequent posts! 😉

Related Content:

Fewer Decisions = More Energy

How Teachers Can Use Less Willpower

Why Teachers Should Almost Always Be Calm

 

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Note: Source material for much of the above comes from Emma Seppala’s excellent book, The Happiness Track.

10 Ways to Stay Motivated About Teaching

Being motivated about teaching is easy in September. You’ve just had a long summer of relaxation and you’re looking forward to starting fresh with a new class. Like a Detroit Lions’ football season, it doesn’t matter how bad things sucked last year, there’s hope that this year will be different.

However, much like those hapless Lions, by the time February rolls around, hope has been replaced with reality. Those new ideas you couldn’t wait to try didn’t really turn out the way you thought they would. Your resolution to be more positive, or show more gratitude, or not let your boss or stupid district initiatives get under your skin has been forgotten. The precocious kid you thought was so much fun the first two months is now just an annoying know-it-all who takes great pleasure in correcting your every mistake. You’re halfway through the year and you’re not sure how you’re going to get through the rest of it.

It can be tough to stay motivated during the long winter months. So if you find your energy sapped and your greatest fear is that the principal is going to walk in and see you delivering an uninspired lesson to an inattentive class, you might try some of these ten ideas to stay motivated.

1. Change Something

Part of the problem with the middle of the year is that you’ve settled into your routines and every day can start to feel the same. To break the monotony, change something. Swap subjects in your schedule. Start something new, like student blogging or scheduling a Skype with an author.  Start playing music as students enter in the morning. Do a lesson in the gym.  Perform a science experiment that isn’t part of your curriculum.  Make the days less predictable.

2. Address Problems

A mistake I made earlier in my career was avoiding problems in my class. I’d think to myself, well, the year’s half over now. I’ll just change how I do things next year so I won’t have these problems again. Hopefully, you’re smarter than me. Your motivation to do the job well will be destroyed if you have festering issues in the class. Face them head on.  Start a new behavior plan for a challenging student. Change your attention signal if yours isn’t working. Sit a student by herself if she can’t sit by others. Think of it as testing solutions. You have 4-5 months to try out new interventions. If they fail, try something else. But if they work, you can add them to your toolbox and use it the rest of your career. Get testing!

3. Experiment

Just as you can experiment with solving problems in your room, you can experiment with the curriculum. Instead of waiting for a new class to try out that thing you heard about at a conference, implement it right away. If you come up with a new way to teach something, try it! Collect some data. See if it works. Tell others about it. Turn your classroom into a testing ground for innovation.

4. Reread a Favorite Teaching Book

An easy way to rekindle your idealism and pump up your energy level is to read books that motivated you in the past. No teacher can go wrong with Teach Like a Pirate or The Essential 55. Other books that I return to are The Promise of a Pencil, The First Days of School, Best Year Ever, and Teach Like Your Hair’s On Fire.

5. Watch an Inspirational Movie or YouTube Clips

Every once in a while, one of the networks will do a feel good story about a teacher who made a big difference for kids. They always give me a shot of motivation about what’s possible. With the video-on-demand services available today, you don’t have to stumble on these. Hop over to YouTube and do a search for “inspiration for teachers” or search for keynote addresses from some of America’s most inspiring educators.

You could also watch a full-length movie. Teachhub.com has a good list of 12 Must See Movies for Teachers.

6. Pick a Stretch Goal

A stretch goal is a goal that can’t be achieved by incremental changes. It’s a popular business concept that will undoubtedly make its way to our schools. Before you groan, consider choosing a stretch goal for your class to inject a dose of significance into everyone’s work.  It should be difficult, but not quite impossible to achieve. I should require massive commitment. A couple of possibilities are:

  • Every student will ace the next biology test.
  • Every student will read 150 words per minute by the end of the year.
  • Every student will be able to recite Poe’s “Annabel Lee.”
  • Every student will know their multiplication facts by June.

Having an ambitious goal to work toward–something that will necessitate changes to the way everyone does things–can be a great way to up everyone’s motivation, including yours.

7. Teach Meaningful Things

It can be hard to get excited about teaching decimals or heredity.  Some of the required content is just not very inspiring. So teach something that is meaningful to you. I like to carve out 20 minutes a couple of times each week to focus character traits.

59% of respondents to CBIA’s 2013 Hartford-Springfield Business Survey indicated they were having trouble finding and retaining qualified workers because applicants lacked “soft skills” like punctuality, interpersonal skills, teamwork, leadership ability, and work ethic. So teach students stuff that actually matters, like how to shake someone’s hand, the importance of appearance, working with others, and perseverance. Read picture books about honesty. Show video clips of people achieving their goals through hard work. Share life lessons about how you handled adversity in your own life.

Teaching these kinds of important lessons can remind you about why you became a teacher in the first place–to improve kids’ lives. In the end, it won’t matter what your students know if they don’t know how to comport themselves. So motivate yourself by teaching traits you’re passionate about!

8. Learn Something New

Pick up a book on using technology in the classroom and then try it out with your students. Go to a workshop or conference and let those new ideas inspire you to make changes. Follow people on Twitter who are constantly innovating (I recommend Alice Keeler for all things Google Apps for Education). We lose motivation when things go stale.  Keep learning and trying new things and you’ll always have a reason to get up and go to work in the morning.

9. Improve the Life of Just One Student

As much as we like to think we are making a difference in the lives of kids, the truth is that a lot of variables come into play and we can’t control most of them. To instill more meaning into your job, choose one student and dedicate yourself to improving his or her life. Talk to this student about his personal life. Listen to her stories. Give him extra help. Do little things that make a big difference. Write her a thank you card when she helps pick up the classroom. Challenge yourself to see what you can do to make just that one student’s life a little better.

10. Fake It

Sometimes you’re just not feeling it. You’re tired. The damn sun has been hiding behind clouds for a week. Your class is acting up. Your motivation is at zero. The last thing you feel like doing is delivering an energetic lesson on the Civil War. This is when it’s time to fake it until you make it. Remember, you’re a teacher, which means you’re an actor. So put on your game face and perform. Sometimes, just pretending to be excited can actually make you excited.

Bonus

If all else fails, take a day off. If you’re a low-energy dud who’s snarling at your students and grumbling at your colleagues, no one wants you there anyway, and you probably aren’t doing anyone any good. Take a day. Recharge. And come back with renewed vigor.  And if your principal questions your use of the sick day, tell her you were sick. Because you were.

You were sick of working.

Question: What do you do to stay motivated during the middle of the year? Leave your ideas in the comments!

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